Tag Archives: Michael Carter-Williams

Note-A-Bulls: Defeated Bulls show no fight in embarrassing loss to Timberwolves

I watched this game via NBA League Pass. 10 minutes prior to tipoff, I continuously watched tight shots of the Timberwolves DJ spin records. I love sports. The shorthanded Bulls squared off against the Minnesota Timberwolves on Sunday with a depleted starting five. The game concluded a 6-game road trip, hoping for a 3-3 stretch. Jimmy Butler, Nikola Mirotic, Paul Zipser, and Dwyane Wade all sat out in Sunday’s tilt.

Robin Lopez and Gorgui Dieng squared off at center court, with Lopez winning the tip. Just like that, Bulls basketball was on the air. The Bulls sported their usual red road jerseys while the Wolves wore what usually is their blue road jersey. To not much surprise, the Bulls started out slow offensively. They started out 2/9 from the field, and trailed by nine with just under eight minutes to play with the score 14-5 in favor of Minnesota. The offense continued to look abysmal, as the Bulls registered two turnovers into two possessions which led to Minnesota extending their early lead to 14.  Rajon Rondo checked in at around the 6:00 mark as Fred Hoiberg looked for spark offensively. Rondo was able to register one assist on a nice pass to Bobby Portis that was the first three of the game for the Bulls. However, the world would eventually find its course again, and the Bulls defense just looked pathetic. At the 2:40 mark, they trailed 31-12. Minnesota was shooting 72 percent from the floor, while the Bulls were just over 35 percent. If you thought there was any sign of momentum coming the Bulls way, you were wrong. Minnesota led 34-17 after the first quarter.

Things weren’t much better as the second quarter started up. The Wolves began the quarter on a 11-2 run which extended their lead to 26 points. Fred Hoiberg used a timeout with just under 9 minutes to go in the half, as Minnesota continued to enforce their will on the Bulls. Shots were not falling and the defense looked lazy. The only entertainment that was out there for Bulls fans was the voice of former Head Coach of the Bulls Tom Thibodeau screaming at his players despite having a 26-point lead. Both bench units were out on the floor around the halfway mark of the second quarter. This was the Bulls opportunity to get some kind of life, and they were able to drop the lead to 20 with just over six minutes to play in the first half. However, things just continued to look awful for the Bulls as the minutes shrunk in the second quarter. At the 3:00 minute mark, Minnesota had more points in the paint (30) than the Bulls did total (27). The Bulls finally looked like they were getting some offense together as the half came to an end. They hit five straight field goals to cut the Wolves’ lead to 17. Despite the lead still being rather large, the strong finish allowed the Bulls to grab some kind of momentum heading into the half.

Any sign of that momentum carrying over from halftime looked unlikely. Minnesota began the quarter on a 9-3 run. Stacey King put it well after Dieng threw down a wide-open dunk that it was time for players to sit on the bench. The Bulls seemed like they had no spark to them. Then, just a few minutes later, the cycle repeated itself. The Bulls got a couple stops on the defensive end and were able to turn those stops into points and cut the lead to 18 at the 7:00 mark. However, Minnesota didn’t come back with pushing their lead back to over 20. The Bulls used a common strategy when trailing by over 20, which is living by the three. This strategy doesn’t usually pan out well for the Bulls, as they rank No. 30 in the league (dead last) in 3-point field goal percentage. You could view today’s game as an outlier, as at the 2:30 mark in the third the Bulls were shooting 62.5 percent from distance. But of course, this comeback effort proved to be worthless. Minnesota climbed right back into the driver’s seat, extending their lead to 19. The Bulls had a 4 on 1 breakaway chance with Michael Carter-Williams carrying the basketball. For whatever reason, MCW decided to attack the rim and not make a pass until he was halfway in the air, and the Bulls turned it over. You just can’t make plays like that. It’s about as close to a free basket as one can have.

There wasn’t much that changed in the game at the start of the fourth quarter. The Bulls continue to shoot the three well, Tom Thibodeau continued to bark like a dog, and the Wolves led by around 20 points.  The sloppy play dragged on, and the bus was starting to warm up. There was just nothing that would please you as a Bulls fan that happened today. Andrew Wiggins showed off his athleticism as he made Doug McDermott beg for mercy after throwing down this ferocious slam. Stacey put it well: “You might want to take away his right-hand Doug. He’s right handed.” The minutes got smaller, and the Wolves lead got larger. Minnesota picked up one of the easiest wins they’ll have all year, with the final score hitting 117-89.

It was more than likely that the Bulls were going to struggle offensively in this game without their two best players. However, this performance was just unacceptable. The Bulls have been terrible against bad teams all year, but getting blown out to team that has been poor like the Wolves must raise questions. Team chemistry seems to be at a low, and I don’t know what the Bulls can do to fix that. They’ve got two games this week before the All-Star break. If they’re able to pick up some steam heading into the break, that could carry over well. These two games are huge for the Bulls, and let’s hope they realize that.

Up Next: The Bulls play host to the Raptors on Valentine’s Day as they look to snap out of their most recent funk.

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Note-A-BULLs: Chicago Bulls Take Season Opener Against Celtics

In case you missed it, this off-season, the Bulls ditched Derrick Rose, Pau Gasol, and Joakim Noah, and replaced them with The Big Three (lol) of Dwyane Wade, Rajon Rondo, and Robin Lopez (… no, you’re thinking of Brook Lopez. Almost the same thing). The arrival of these three is in line with the plan to get younger, faster, more athletic, and complement Fred Hoiberg’s patented Hoiball TM. Well, alright, not exactly. Ok, not at all. But maybe they can be good anyway because getting into the playoffs is fun. Let’s break down the Bulls home opener as they move to 1-0 on the season (undefeated!).

  • The Bulls’ offense looks about the same as it did last year whenever Pau Gasol wasn’t in the game: a series of dribble hand-offs around the perimeter, followed up by a drive baseline with the defense icing, and kicked for a contested three. Oh, and the occasional back-cut alley oop from the top of the key to Jimmy Butler. But, this year we get to mix in some Rajon Rondo passing magic, and some Dwyane Wade threes (you heard me right), which is exciting.
  • The Bulls led by as many as 15 in this game, with a starting five of Rajon Rondo, Dwyane Wade, Jimmy Butler, Taj Gibson, and Robin Lopez. The Celtics went on a 14-3 run to open the third quarter and cut it to one, taking a small lead later on in the period, before the Bulls responded with a run of their own to regain and extend the lead to six, ending the third quarter.
  • They started the fourth with the hodge podge of Wade, Michael Carter-Williams (MCW), Lopez, Nikola Mirotic, and Doug McDermott. And as these NBA games tend to go, unless you stomp on a team’s throat when they’re down, they won’t go away. The Bulls went on a 9-0 run in the fourth to take a 95-81 lead, but the Celtics did not go away, and the Bulls could only score four points over the next five minutes to allow the Celtics back into this one with an 11-0 run of their own. But Wade had the answer with a step-back three to seal the game late; the final: 105-99.
  • I made fun of the Bulls for having Dwyane Wade as one of their main three point threats, and I will continue to do so. But tonight, he made me look foolish (last year he was 7/44). He was 4/6 from beyond the arc- one, a desperation shot as the shot clock wound down, and one, a clutch three ball to lock up the game. He had 22 points and five assists, leading the team with a +15 in 32 minutes.
  • The Bulls made seven three pointers in the first half, one of which was a Butler buzzer beater as the half expired on a pull up three. He’s still settling for step-back threes – perhaps a bad habit hangover from last year. He had 24 points in 36 minutes on 6/17 from the field, but was 4/6 on the three ball and got to the line 12 times, knocking down eight.
  • Jimmy Butler and Jae Crowder got into a scuffle when JB tried to take a charge from Crowder, then tripped Crowder as they got their legs entangled. Jae put the ball on Jimmy’s chest, and a technical foul was issued to both players, as well as ones on Isaiah Thomas and Rajon Rondo for getting in the mix as well. Much ado about nothing, let’s play basketball. All of this was strange, considering Butler and Crowder were teammates at Marquette. Some people might pat Butler on the back for having some fire in the home opener, but I thought the tripping was kind of petty.
  • Taj Gibson was a nice threat inside; his footwork looks improved from last year, posting 18 points on 8/13, and 10 rebounds for a nice double-double.
  • Rajon Rondo still can’t shoot – four points on 1/9 shooting, but he’s not here for that. He had nine assists and six boards.
  • Butler, Wade, and Rondo led the team in minutes. I’m not sure how sustainable that’s going to be with the latter two going forward, but Jimmy has proven he can handle the work load.
  • Doug McDermott was a non-factor in this game, shooting 2-5 with five points, and was scoreless from outside in 21 minutes.
  • Mirotic still not getting calls on the defensive end. Noteworthy? Probably not. But I noted it. He had 15 points on 6/11 shooting, but was a paltry 1/6 from deep.
  • MCW had one small flurry of good play coupled with a bit of unorganized mess, which is par for the course, given that he was the least efficient player in the NBA as a rookie two seasons ago, despite being Rookie of the Year (basically, he was the only offensive option on a crappy team and had a lot of points as a result).
  • Robin Lopez played too, I think… right? *Checks box score* Yep, he was there. He played 27 minutes.
  • The Bulls ran out 16 five-man lineups tonight. The one that had the most success (+11 in over 12 minutes): the starting five. The one with the least success (-5): Butler, MCW, Lopez, Mirotic, Rondo. Fortunately, that lineup only played for about a minute and a half.
  • A word about the Celtics: they had a lot of energy tonight, but looked a little disheveled on defense, which is strange for a team that was fourth in defensive efficiency last year. After adding Al Horford and Amir Johnson into the mix, I would imagine it will take them a couple weeks to get into a groove. Expect this team to be tough.
  • Up Next: The Bulls welcome Paul George and the Pacers to the United Center on Saturday night in a heavyweight matchup of undefeated teams.

The New #1 won’t do #2

It appears as if Bulls management is looking to steer into the skid.

In a move that would’ve been been met with intrigue back in 2013 when these two were first drafted, the Bulls shipped Tony Snell to the Milwaukee Bucks for Michael Carter-Williams in a 1-for-1 deal that had both fan bases thinking, “Why not?”

The Bucks are looking to replace Khris Middleton (who is expected to miss six months after hamstring surgery) with the clearance sale version of him in Snell. Meanwhile, the Bulls are continuing to show that the most backward thinking front office has not changed its ways.

I feel safe in saying that not many will feel Snell’s absence when the 2016-2017 season kicks off next week, as he was already lacking any significant playing time, but I struggle to see how this move benefits the Bulls in any way. I’m sure both clubs are thinking a change of scenery will do this duo some good, but nothing in their careers has pointed towards any evidence of this.

MCW’s biggest weakness is his three point shooting. He is a career 25% shooter from the outside and will be a nice complement to the starting point guard Rajon Rondo, a career 29% 3-point shooter.

This comes as no surprise to anyone who has followed this team in the offseason as GarPax continue to assemble the worst shooting team in NBA history while the league moves more and more in the space and pop direction.

Not only does it clog up the court when MCW inhabits it, it also clogs up the guard spot on the Bulls roster. The Bulls currently have four point guards in Rondo, MCW, Spencer Dinwiddie, and Jerian Grant. While Grant will more than likely be cut, Dinwiddie showed flashes that made those who watched feel as though he could be a nice backup PG. He also has shown the potential to shoot the ball when in college at Colorado and is a big body that makes him a competent defender.

However, Bulls fans may never know what he has to offer in the regular season as he is not only stuck at PG behind Rondo and MCW but also at SG where he is behind Wade, Valentine, and more than likely Canaan. Say nothing for Snell, but at least the guy could play multiple positions.

All things considered, I don’t think this move greatly impacts the Bulls one way or the other , it’s just further evidence that GarPax are grasping at straws at this point and hoping to pull out a rose (pun sort of intended).

 

Making Sense of Trade Deadline MADNESS

This past Thursday was the most amazing trade deadline in years for us basketball junkies. So much occurred in the 11th hour before the clock hit 3:00 PM EST. Twitter was a tweeting as deals were being reported left and right and everything was coming at us at once. All of this was really hard to digest right away, and still a few days later it’s not entirely clear what every team was thinking. So here’s your guide through what actually went down, and why.

Before we get to the “nitty-gritty” and the game of “point guard roulette” that was played, lets quickly recap all the minor trades that transpired. I’m going to skip over the really inconsequential moves because nobody wants to hear my rambling thoughts on Pablo Prigioni going from New York to Houston, or why Ramon Sessions was traded for the 147th time. Here we go…

Celtics acquire Isaiah Thomas from Suns for Marcus Thornton and a 2016 first-round pick from the Cavaliers

Why did it happen?

The Celtics have been pretty fond of Isaiah Thomas dating back to last off-season. Danny Ainge saw an opening to get him and in exchange gave away one of their many future 1st round picks. The Celtics are the most “un-tanky” of all the “tankiest” teams in the league (those are words now). Boston is really not helping themselves only being bad enough to secure the somewhere around 11th pick in lottery. Suns pick up a future asset and cut their losses with the ill-fated Thomas signing.

76ers trade K.J. McDaniels to Rockets for Isaiah Canaan and 2015 second-round pick

Why did it happen?

K.J. McDaniels is on a goofy one year deal and because of his play this year some team is likely to give him an offer sheet that the Sixers aren’t interested in paying. Further, many in Philadelphia are saying that Sam Hinkie doesn’t really want to deal with K.J.’s agent after botching the initial contract negotiations. Plus the Sixers really like Isaiah Canaan and have tracked him since last year’s draft, and now have an obvious void at PG. Houston grabs another wing player who can defend really well and could see minutes in the playoffs.

KG minny

Brooklyn sends Kevin Garnett to Minnesota for Thaddeus Young

Why did it happen?

Flip Saunders is a genius, and when I say genius, I mean he makes other GM’s look like geniuses. T’Wolves traded a first round pick for 50 games of Thad Young, and then traded Thad so they could have a family reunion with the corpse of KG. Now they may want to extend the contract of said corpse. Flip you continue to amaze us all.

Trail Blazers acquire Arron Afflalo and Alonzo Gee from Nuggets in exchange for Will Barton, Victor Claver, Thomas Robinson and a lottery-protected 2016 first round draft pick

Why did it happen?

Blazers get a key pickup in Afflalo who can provide scoring off the bench, something Portland needs desperately. Only costs them a future first rounder, and likely a pick that will land between 22-30. Nuggets who are now in a rebuild, acquire an asset.

All of this brings us to one of the biggest trade deadline clusterf&*%s we’ve ever seen…let’s dive into it.

In three-team trade, the Thunder acquire Enes Kanter and Steve Novak from the Jazz for Kendrick Perkins, Grant Jerrett and two draft picks (one from the Pistons); Oklahoma City also receives D.J. Augustin and Kyle Singler from Detroit for Reggie Jackson.

Why did it happen?

Let’s start with the Jazz. Kanter publicly announced he wanted out, Utah obliged and picked up some future draft picks. The Jazz are eager to start the Rudy Gobert era, and losing Kanter probably won’t haunt them. Detroit upgraded the PG position in hopes to squeeze into one of the final playoff spots in the East this season and prepare for the future. Reggie is for sure an upgrade from Augustin, and they could choose to resign him this off-season as an insurance policy if Brandon Jennings recovery is stunted. But that is something Stan Van Gundy will have to attend to later. They desperately want to make the playoffs, that’s why the deal went down.

Which brings us to OKC, who is a clear winner in this trade. They discarded an unhappy Reggie Jackson for a low post threat in Kanter, as well as some solid bench pieces in Augustin, Singler, and Novak. This gives OKC a really deep roster which could spur them to a title run this year. Augustin can definitely hold his own as a backup PG; Kanter at times is a very gifted low post scorer and may command double teams on some nights. They also acquire two lights-out three point shooters that could hit some big shots during the playoffs with so much defensive attention constantly going towards Durant and Westbrook.

goran dragic fox sports

In three-team trade, Suns send Goran and Zoran Dragic to Heat in exchange for Danny Granger and two draft picks, while also acquiring John Salmons from Pelicans; New Orleans gets Norris Cole, Justin Hamilton and Shawne Williams from Miami.

Why did it happen?

Dragic was emphatic over the displeasure he had with the Suns front office, and basically forced Phoenix’s hand to deal him before the deadline passed. Pat Riley savvily stole Dragic for essentially nothing: some fringe NBA players and future first round picks that Riley himself will probably never be in office to select. Miami’s league-worst stable of point guards was their one true weakness now that Hassan Whiteside has emerged as the reincarnation of Alonzo Mourning.

Acquiring Dragic, who was second team All-NBA last season, was such a huge acquisition for Miami that for a short 24 hours they perhaps were a dark horse title contender before Chris Bosh’s scary blood clot issue was discovered. But Miami will likely be able to resign Goran during the offseason and could potentially compete in 2016. More importantly, Bosh will be okay. So the Suns acquire more future picks and rid themselves of an unhappy Dragic. They also receive Danny Granger and John Salmons, who both could be waived or just wither away on the bench for the rest of the season. New Orleans get a warm-blooded backup PG in Norris Cole, which is something they need if they are to beat out OKC for the eight spot, though it is highly unlikely. Jrue Holiday’s injury is taking a turn for the worse, and you really can’t have Tyreke Evans playing 40 minutes a night at the point.

In three-team deal, Bucks send Brandon Knight and Kendall Marshall to Suns in exchange for Tyler Ennis and Miles Plumlee; Additionally, Phoenix sends their protected 2015 first-round pick from the Lakers to 76ers, and Philadelphia sends Michael Carter-Willams to Milwaukee

Why did it happen?

This was clearly the most shocking trade of the whole deadline. The Bucks imploding their frontcourt and trading their leading scorer during a playoff run is not a strategy many teams subscribe to. The Bucks must have felt that impending restricted free agent Brandon Knight was worth more to the open market this summer than he was to their organization. Milwaukee is not interested in paying a dollar figure potentially between $12-15 million that Knight will command this summer. So instead they swap in Michael Carter-Williams who is at least under team control for two more years.

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The problem is they’re swapping Knight for possibly the worst shooter in the entire league. They do gain a 6’6″ point guard and now have a stable of players who are extremely long and can defend multiple positions. Jason Kidd likely sees a lot of himself in MCW and must feel that he can work with him to fix his woeful jump shot.

The Bucks definitely improve on defense, but will now really struggle to score the ball in the halfcourt and don’t really have someone to go to in crunch time. That will really hinder them this season, but going forward with Jabari Parker and the Greek Freak, they will surely be an interesting team to watch. They also acquire Miles Plumlee and Tyler Ennis to add more bodies to an already deep bench.

The Suns get a pretty good replacement for Goran Dragic in Brandon Knight. Dragic is much better than Knight, but Knight may fit better into the Suns guard dominated offense. Knight is much more a combo guard than Dragic was and can be a prolific scorer. The duo of Bledsoe and Knight seems like a more natural fit than the Bledsoe and Dragic duo, because Knight can easily transition into the 2 spot. They painted themselves in a corner when they alienated Dragic and were forced to deal him and try and get some value before he became a free agent this summer. Phoenix really screwed this up, but Brandon Knight could pay dividends for the Suns eventually.

What won’t pay dividends is the idiotic move to trade the Lakers top five protected pick to Philadelphia. It’s just insane to let that pick go. They must have proposed multiple deals not involving the Lakers pick before they eventually caved to Milwaukee and Philadelphia’s demands. Losing the pick is bad, but losing Dragic and getting nothing return is worse. So they downgraded from Dragic to Knight and let go of an asset that had the potential to land them a future star this summer. Wow. That’s some Flip Saunders-like ineptitude.

So here’s what the Sixers and Sam Hinkie were thinking when they dealt away the “current” face of the franchise. The Sixers are not in the business of trying to become average; they’re trying to reach greatness. To the Sixers, MCW was just an average prospect who may have hit his ceiling. They did not view him as a future cog going forward; he plays the deepest position in the entire league and is 100% replaceable in their eyes.

Another reason for ditching MCW is that his numbers are inflated because of the run ‘n’ gun style the Sixers play, they have more offensive possessions than most teams. He also constantly has the ball in his hands and only shoots 38% from the field, and 26% from three (I just threw up in my mouth reading those numbers). His numbers are just awful by any standards for a starting guard in this league.

The Sixers want to develop a team around stars and MCW is never going to be one. By acquiring the Lakers’ protected pick, they are just giving themselves another opportunity to hit the lottery and draft a potential building block. They don’t really feel like they are taking a huge step back by shedding MCW either. By draft, trade, or free agency, the Sixers are constantly seeking the right opportunity to nab a superstar. Hinkie himself is one of the guys who orchestrated the James Harden trade. That is a type of scenario that they will be looking for moving forward, besides just drafting talent. Remaining flexible by staying way under the salary cap and gathering tons of valuable assets is what will make the Sixers a desired trade partner when a star from another team becomes available.

It’s not often those types of draft picks like the Lakers’ become available. It has the potential to be great, and the Sixers were selling high on MCW. Especially considering he’s a PG who can’t shoot and whose only viable trait is his height. All of this trying to acquire and develop around stars is easier said than done, I realize. But what the Sixers want to do is build something that will last not just a few years, but possibly for a decade or longer. The Sixers management is dedicated to building something special and you can begin to see through the mist if you squint really hard. The Hinkie strategy may seem outrageous to many and logical to few, but on Thursday they made the easy decision.

One is Better Than None

For some reason, Madonna’s hit song from 1984 was running through my head after the Sixers had won their first game to quietly evade history: “Like a virgin, touched for the very first time.” It kind of perfectly encapsulates the season thus far. The Sixers are a team without any experience, and a large bulk of the players on the team had never even won an NBA game before Wednesday. And in case you were wondering, no, I don’t have any qualms comparing my team to a Madonna song.

I know we shouldn’t be celebrating a team that had lost 17 straight games and who narrowly avoided one of the more embarrassing records in NBA history (18 straight losses to begin a season). But sorry I’m not sorry. This win actually felt great as a long suffering Sixers fan. It just felt like a huge chip had been taken off the city’s shoulder. Of course we understand the long term goals of the Sixers and there is virtually no difference between starting 1-17 and 0-18 but as fan you really start to feel and empathize with these players. Regardless of how much talent they lack, they give 110% night in and night out because most of these guys are just trying to stick around in the NBA for more than a couple months.

Michael Carter-Williams is a guy you have to feel for. He’s a true NBA talent and if you watch you can sense the mounting frustration that piles on him every day. He’s going to incur a lifetime of putrid NBA basketball games before the Sixers final roster is complete in a few years. They say in sports there are also moral victories; I think this win belongs in that category as well for MCW. It was also great to see this team get a win because they have been close so many times and the streak needed to end.

This is typically how I am forced to watch Sixers basketball:

Wednesday’s game against Minnesota could also be described as one of the worst basketball games ever played. The first half ended at a paltry 34-32 and there were more turnovers in this game than in a Dutch bakery. But that was actually a perfect recipe for the Sixers to finally chalk one up in the win column.

The Sixers had given up a double digit lead in the first half and I kind of thought the inevitable was going to happen: the T’Wolves would regroup and take out the Sixers. There are certain things you can count on in life; death, taxes, and the Sixers losing in terrible fashion. My expressions during this game were varied. I started out hopeful, then sank into despair, and this finally turned into ecstasy.

There were some unlikely heroes. How about Robert Covington? If you don’t know who Robert Covington is, I’m not going to crucify you because I didn’t know who he was until a few weeks ago. But he’s actually a pretty accomplished NBA D-League player (huge oxymoron), so he was a perfect fit for the Sixers. He came into the game in the fourth quarter and was unconscious and knocked down some critical three point shots for the Sixers. The Sixers were holding a six point lead inside one minute and to tell you the truth I kind of expected them to lose still. Somehow, Mo Williams was going to hit a three with MCW in his face and then steal the inbounds and do it all over again like he was a reincarnated Reggie Miller. But for once the Sixers held on and I couldn’t be happier.

Since I started this piece on a bit of a pop-culture kick…

The Sixers represent Happy Gilmore, the most unconventional golfer of all-time. The Sixers are the most unconventional team ever assembled in the NBA. Unconventional in terms of assembling a team with no talent or chance of winning games, when all other teams are trying to do the complete opposite. Happy’s final putt kind of represents this Sixers-TWolves game. The Sixers are looking at this huge obstacle (setting a bad record) in front of them. Happy’s shot takes all kinds of twists and turns, and the crowd is just in this awkward gaze. This is similar to watching the Sixers; many times I catch myself with just a stunned look at watching the reckless abandon and complete lack of basketball IQ they play with. Then finally when the putt sinks you can’t help but to feel overwhelmed with joy and amazement. I had to kind of pinch myself after the Sixers game had ended to make sure they actually won. I couldn’t help but to get up off the couch and celebrate, also because I don’t know how many more times I’ll be able to do that this season.

This win will likely amount to nothing, and when they play the Thunder on Friday they will most definitely get blown out. However it was fun to bask in this win for about 48 hours and I know Brett Brown will be giving this speech in the locker room before the next game.